1 very easy 10 min bento blanch chicken karashi Recipes - Japanese reduced sodium seri

Seri to toriniku no karashijoyu-ae / water dropwort and chicken in mustard soy sauce dressing

Seri water dropwort goes really well with chicken. Here is a quick, light side dish using boiled chicken from making chicken stock.

57 calories (1/2 of recipe); 8.2 g protein; 1.3 g fat; 1.3 g carbohydrate; 0.9 g net carbs; 83 mg sodium (with 50% reduced-sodium soy sauce; approximately 180 mg with regular soy sauce); 39 mg cholesterol; 0.4 g fiber

<Ingredients>

Handful (30-40 g) seri water dropwort (30 g in photo) 60g boiled chicken breast
1 tbsp sake
1/2 tsp karashi Japanese mustard powder
1 tbsp dashi
1 tsp soy sauce

<Directions>
1.

Tear boiled chicken into smaller pieces, and pour over sake.

Cover, and microwave for 20 seconds or so.
Uncover, and let cool.

2.

Bring plenty of water to boil, and blanch seri.

When color brightens (takes only several seconds), immediately transfer to ice water to stop cooking.

When seri cools, squeeze out excess water, and cut into 3-4 cm.

3.

Add some dashi to karashi powder, and mix well.

Mix karashi paste with remaining dashi and soy sauce.

4.

Immediately before serving, add chicken and liquid (sake pooled at bottom) to mustard soy sauce dressing, and mix well.

Once again squeeze out excess water from seri, and add to chicken while fluffing up with fingers.

Mix well.

Serve only chicken and seri; leave all excess dressing in prep bowl.

<Notes>

  • Leftover pieces of roast chicken work great, too. If there is no cooked chicken at hand, boil, steam or saute some — sasami chicken tenders would be a good choice. There is no need to add salt or other seasoning if cooking chicken first for this dish.
  • Make sure only to quickly blanch seri to achieve the crispy texture in the final dish.
  • The above sodium content excludes dressing left in prep bowl. The total sodium figure is 100 mg with 50% reduced-sodium soy sauce and approx. 200 mg with regular soy sauce.

Leave a Reply

free email series
5 Secrets to Japanese Cooking
Making flavorful Japanese food is EASIER than you think.
You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the link in the footer of our emails. For information about our privacy practices, please visit our website.